The Civil War: The Story of the War with Maps, M. David Detweiler

The Civil War: The Story of the War with Maps, M. David Detweiler


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The Civil War: The Story of the War with Maps, M. David Detweiler

The Civil War: The Story of the War with Maps, M. David Detweiler

This book differs from other historical atlases by focusing largely on the overall position across the entire battle front from the Mississippi to the Atlantic Coast for most of the war, before shrinking to cover the area between Sherman in the west and Grant vs Lee in the east during 1864-5.

Major battles do get their own maps – Antietam gets ten over five pages for the battle itself and more showing the build-up, Gettysburg seventeen for the battle – and excellent supporting text, but for me its the many overview maps that give this book its value. We get to see the overall course of the war in a single glance, so the Confederate successes in Virginia are always balanced by Union successes in the west.

The text is sometimes rather breathless, an approach that gives some sense of the urgency of events (even if that wasn't always shared by some of the Union commanders). There is also some good material on the political background, the impact of military matters on elections in the North and the issue of slavery. The text also shares the same overview approach as the maps, with brief mentions of events elsewhere dropped into the account of activities in Virginia to remind the reader that there were always other fronts.

The final map is a rather nice touch, showing the reunited United States as it was at the end of the Civil War.

Chapters
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

Author: M. David Detweiler
Edition: Paperback
Pages: 168
Publisher: Stackpole Books
Year: 2015



The Civil War: The Story of the War with Maps

The Civil War: The Story of the War with Maps combines the colorful, detailed maps of an atlas with the vivid storytelling of the best narratives to piece together the nation-spanning jigsaw puzzle of the American Civil War. See the conflict develop from a few small armies into total war engulfing the whole South. …mehr

  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: STACKPOLE CO
  • Seitenzahl: 168
  • Erscheinungstermin: 15. November 2014
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 279mm x 215mm x 15mm
  • Gewicht: 553g
  • ISBN-13: 9780811714495
  • ISBN-10: 0811714497
  • Artikelnr.: 40751139

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The Civil War : The Story of the War with Maps

The Civil War: The Story of the War with Maps combines the colorful, detailed maps of an atlas with the vivid storytelling of the best narratives to piece together the nation-spanning jigsaw puzzle of the American Civil War. See the conflict develop from a few small armies into total war engulfing the whole South.

The campaigns and battles are all here, with maps zooming in on the maneuvering and attacking armies: Bull Run, Shiloh, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, the Wilderness, Atlanta, and more.
The nationwide perspective--absent from so many other books and shown here on full-page maps--connects these dots into a cohesive story of the entire war, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River, from Pennsylvania to the Gulf of Mexico.
Distilling events into their essentials, the text focuses on the military history of the conflict and its cast of colorful commanders--Lee, Grant, Sherman, McClellan, and Stonewall Jackson.
Captures all the war's intensity and human drama, its epic sweep from Sumter to Appomattox.

The result is a unique book that educates, enlightens, and entertains. An ideal introduction for newcomers, refresher for buffs, and companion to other books during the war's 150th anniversary and beyond
show more


The Civil War

For readers addicted to histories or novels about the Civil War, a common challenge is the lack of adequate maps. This excellent volume satisfies that need, once and for all: It's the clearest, fullest collection of strategic and tactical maps available, a fine volume on its own and an indispensable aid to understanding many another book. Few works truly are 'must-haves' for a Civil War collection, but this one's essential. --Ralph Peters, author of Cain at Gettysburg and Hell or Richmond The Civil War: The Story of the War with Maps combines the colorful, detailed maps of an atlas with the vivid storytelling of the best narratives to piece together the nation-spanning jigsaw puzzle of the American Civil War. See the conflict develop from a few small armies into total war engulfing the whole South. * The campaigns and battles are all here, with maps zooming in on the maneuvering and attacking armies: Bull Run, Shiloh, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, the Wilderness, Atlanta, and more.* The nationwide perspective--absent from so many other books and shown here on full-page maps--connects these dots into a cohesive story of the entire war, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River, from Pennsylvania to the Gulf of Mexico. * Distilling events into their essentials, the text focuses on the military history of the conflict and its cast of colorful commanders--Lee, Grant, Sherman, McClellan, and Stonewall Jackson.* Captures all the war's intensity and human drama, its epic sweep from Sumter to Appomattox. The result is a unique book that educates, enlightens, and entertains. An ideal introduction for newcomers, refresher for buffs, and companion to other books during the wara (TM)s 150th anniversary and beyond.

M. David Detweiler graduated from Yale and has worked as a journalist and editor and published short stories and novels. He was the key editor for Gettysburg: The Story of the Battle with Maps. Detweiler is an amateur military history buff, composer, and sometime fly angler. President and CEO of Stackpole Inc. for the past quarter century, he lives in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, with his wife and enjoys chasing the unsolvable what-ifs of history.


Contents

After the end of American Civil War, various state and local organizations were formed for veterans to network and maintain connections with each other. Many of the veterans used their shared experiences as a basis for fellowship. Groups of men began joining together, first for camaraderie and later for political power. Emerging as most influential among the various organizations during the first post-war years was the Grand Army of the Republic, founded on April 6, 1866, on the principles of "Fraternity, Charity and Loyalty," in Decatur, Illinois, by Dr. Benjamin F. Stephenson and the first GAR Post was established in Decatur, Illinois. [1]

The GAR initially grew and prospered as a de facto political arm of the Republican Party during the heated political contests of the Reconstruction Era. The commemoration of Union Army and Navy veterans, black and white, immediately became entwined with partisan politics. The GAR promoted voting rights for Negro veterans, as many white veterans recognized their demonstrated patriotism and sacrifices, providing one of the first racially integrated social/fraternal organizations in America. Black veterans, who enthusiastically embraced the message of equality, shunned black veterans' organizations in preference for racially inclusive and integrated groups. But when the Republican Party's commitment to reform in the South gradually decreased, the GAR's mission became ill-defined and the organization floundered. The GAR almost disappeared in the early 1870s, and many state-centered divisions, named "departments", and local posts ceased to exist. [2]

In his General Order No. 11, dated May 5, 1868, first GAR Commander-in-Chief, General John A. Logan declared May 30 to be Memorial Day (also referred to for many years as "Decoration Day"), calling upon the GAR membership to make the May 30 observance an annual occurrence. Although not the first time war graves had been decorated, Logan's order effectively established "Memorial Day" as the day upon which Americans now pay tribute to all their war casualties, missing-in-action, and deceased veterans. As decades passed, similarly inspired commemorations also spread across the South as "Confederate Memorial Day" or "Confederate Decoration Day", usually in April, led by organizations of Southern soldiers in the parallel United Confederate Veterans. [3]

In the 1880s, the Union veterans' organization revived under new leadership that provided a platform for renewed growth, by advocating Federal pensions for veterans. As the organization revived, black veterans joined in significant numbers and organized local posts. The national organization, however, failed to press the case for similar pensions for black soldiers. Most black troops never received any pension or remuneration for wounds incurred during their Civil War service. [4]

The GAR was organized into "Departments" at the state level and "Posts" at the community level, and military-style uniforms were worn by its members. There were posts in every state in the U.S., and several posts overseas. [4] The pattern of establishing departments and local posts was later used by other American military veterans' organizations, such as the Veterans of Foreign Wars (organized originally for veterans of the Spanish–American War and the Philippine Insurrection) and the later American Legion (for the First World War and later expanded to include subsequent World War II, Korean, Vietnam and Middle Eastern wars).

The G.A.R.'s political power grew during the latter part of the 19th century, and it helped elect several United States presidents, beginning with the 18th, Ulysses S. Grant, and ending with the 25th, William McKinley. Six Civil War veterans (Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, Chester A. Arthur Benjamin Harrison, and McKinley) were elected President of the United States all were Republicans. (The sole post-war Democratic president was Grover Cleveland, the 22nd and 24th chief executive.) For a time, candidates could not get Republican presidential or congressional nominations without the endorsement of the GAR veterans voting bloc. Of the six mentioned US Presidents, at least four were members of the G.A.R.:

    (Lt General of the Union Armies) Became a member of the Philadelphia PA George G. Meade Post GAR Post # 1 May 16, 1877 [5][6] (Brevet Major General) Became a Member of the Fremont Ohio Manville Moore GAR Post [7] (Major General) Possibly a member of the G.A.R.-a GAR Post publication refers to the death of Comrade James Garfield, President of the United States [8] (Brevet Brigadier General) Became a member of the Indianapolis Indiana General George H. Thomas GAR Post [9] . (Brevet Major of the 23d Ohio) Became a member of the Canton Ohio GAR Post # 25 July 7, 1880 [It was later renamed McKinley GAR Post # 25] [10]

With membership strictly limited to "veterans of the late unpleasantness," the GAR encouraged the formation of Allied Orders to aid them in various works. Numerous male organizations jousted for the backing of the GAR, and the political battles became quite severe until the GAR finally endorsed the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War as its heir.

Female members Edit

Although an overwhelmingly male organization, the GAR is known to have had at least two women who were members.

The first female known to be admitted to the GAR was Kady Brownell, who served in the Union Army with her husband Robert, a private in the 1st Rhode Island Infantry at the First Battle of Bull Run in Virginia and with the 5th Rhode Island Infantry at the Battle of New Berne in North Carolina. Kady was admitted as a member in 1870 to Elias Howe Jr. Post #3, in Bridgeport, Connecticut. The GAR insignia is engraved on her gravestone in the North Burial Ground in Providence, Rhode Island. [11]

In 1897 the GAR admitted Sarah Emma Edmonds, who served in the 2nd Michigan Infantry as a disguised man named Franklin Thompson from May 1861 until April 1863. In 1882, she collected affidavits from former comrades in an effort to petition for a veteran's pension which she received in July 1884. Edmonds was only a member for a brief period as she died September 5, 1898 however she was given a funeral with military honors when she was reburied in Houston in 1901. [12]


The Civil War

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The Civil War The Story of the War with Maps by David M. Detweiler and Publisher Stackpole Books (NBN). Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780811760195, 0811760197. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780811714495, 0811714497.

The Civil War The Story of the War with Maps by David M. Detweiler and Publisher Stackpole Books (NBN). Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780811760195, 0811760197. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780811714495, 0811714497.


Fact Check: Biden Calls Capitol Riot ‘Worst Attack on Our Democracy Since the Civil War’

VERDICT: FALSE. Not only wasn’t it the worst attack on our democracy it wasn’t even the worst attack on the Capitol.

In his first address to Congress, Biden will repeat a lie that has become the foundation of Democrats’ efforts to delegitimize Republican opposition: that the Capitol riot was the “worst attack” on American democracy since the Civil War.

It is a laughable proposition. Five people died in connection with the riot, but only one of them as a direct result of the riot — and she was one of the rioters. The riot aimed to disrupt the certification of the Electoral College vote to elect Biden as the next president, but had no realistic hope of stopping it the certification was held in Congress later that same evening.

Here are several “attacks on democracy” since the Civil War that were far more severe than the Capitol riot of January 6:

Wars: The imperial Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, and “managed to destroy or damage nearly 20 American naval vessels, including eight battleships, and over 300 airplanes. More than 2,400 Americans died in the attack, including civilians, and another 1,000 people were wounded,” according to History.com. Sixty years later, on September 11, 2001, Al Qaeda terrorists hijacked commercial airplanes, flying one into the Pentagon and two into the World Trade Center, destroying the latter a fourth airplane may have intended to target the Capitol itself. Almost 3,000 people were killed.

Assassinations: Four democratically-elected presidents have been assassinated since the Civil War — Abraham Lincoln (1865 — after the war was over), James Garfield (1881), William McKinley (1901), and John F. Kennedy (1963). Ronald Reagan survived an assassination attempt in 1981. Several presidential candidates also survived being shot, including Theodore Roosevelt in 1912, and George Wallace in 1972 there have been other assassination attempts, and many threats.

Attacks on the Capitol: As the USA Today recently noted, along with other media outlets, there have been many attacks on the Capitol — many of them far more severe than the Capitol riot. A Puerto Rican terrorist group opened fire during debate in the House of Representatives in 1954, wounding five members in “the most severe assault in the history of the Capitol building.” The Weather Underground exploded a bomb in the Senate in 1971 another left-wing group carried out a similar attack in 1983 and a gunman opened fire at a Capitol checkpoint in 1998, killing two Capitol Police officers. In 2017, a left-wing gunman opened fire on Republicans during a baseball practice, wounding several, including a Capitol Police officer though the attack did not take place at the Capitol building itself, it was the most serious political violence in recent years. And earlier this month, a radical Nation of Islam follower drove into two Capitol Police, killing Officer William Evans.

Hoaxes: Finally, several “attacks on democracy” that have included efforts to delegitimize the results of democratic elections, such as the Democrats’ false accusation that President Donald Trump won in 2016 through “Russia collusion.” That, arguably, did more to undermine democracy than the Capitol riot, which was roundly condemned by all parties.


Death & Burial: Guideposts to Gettysburg's Dead

When Gettysburg's Union and Confederate dead were exhumed for reburial in proper cemeteries (1863-1873), workers recorded key location and other information about each soldier's grave — a true gift to today's historians. Gettysburg National Military Park

Images of Civil War soldiers are one of the greatest humanizing documents in history. With the development and spread of mass-market photographic techniques, posed portraits of average soldiers — not just wealthy officers — show us the face of war. They had the same concerns as we do today, and loved ones wishing fervently for their safety. In-field documentary photography provided unprecedented evidence of what life in the field was like, and graphic images of the aftermath of battle introduced the world to the harsh and bloody reality of war.

Macabre photos of battlefield dead can and should do much more than illustrate the horrors of combat. To look at the bloated, inhuman forms is to intrinsically know that, just days earlier, the bearers of those grim visages charged toward their fate full of life. Their still forms, captured on glass plates for posterity, elicit pity and prompt obvious, sympathetic questions: Who were they? Were they identified and returned home? What became of their families?

The last portions of the battlefield cleared of their dead include scattered boulders, which provide the best and most precise guideposts to Gettysburg's dead. These Confederate soldiers were laid out for burial on the Rose Farm by friends who lacked the time to complete their grisly task. Left: LOC | Right: Lynn Light Heller

And yet, these images offer far more than emotional resonance. Just as big battles are not isolated clashes between warring armies, but are part of a broader continuum of events, these photos are powerful primary source documents that can teach us much within the broader context of the evidence left behind by soldiers and civilians. Combat physically scarred the terrain and left indelible impressions upon those who witnessed it. These personal experiences were recounted in official and unofficial accounts of the battle, and captured in newspaper reporting. Detailed diaries of soldiers, civilians and, later, relief workers, record minute particulars of the fighting and its aftermath.

Photographers came, too, and left behind a body of work that gives a glimpse of 1863 Gettysburg available nowhere else. And when human remains were exhumed from battlefield graves and moved to proper cemeteries — near and far, small or large — in the weeks, months and years after the battle, those doing the work created a whole new series of records with detailed maps. Thus, thousands of accounts of the battle and its aftermath intersect with photographs, sketches, maps and the battlefield itself to bring to light the deadly scenes of warfare. These physical and figurative guideposts can help us understand not only how the battle unfolded, but also the stories of individual soldiers who fought there.

These Confederates laid out for burial, most likely Georgians or South Carolinians, made their final charge across the fields seen here. Left: LOC | Right: Lynn Light Heller

Of course, to a certain extent, the same is true of any battlefield. But a host of factors — its incredible loss of life, physical location close to eastern population centers, early preservation efforts, prestigious cemetery dedication and more — have rendered Gettysburg the most famous and well-documented of all Civil War actions. Veterans and historians have made great use of this remarkable body of evidence for 152 years and counting, providing insights that can be applied to other battles. The process of combat, death, burial and aftermath that occurred at Gettysburg was mirrored in other communities.

Even with these unparalleled resources, limits to potential discoveries remain. Consider the information both contained in, and lacking from, a typical postwar letter — this one from New Jersey artillery lieutenant Augustine Parsons — describing the action on July 3, 1863:

The account continues and also details the death of another man. We know that Parsons was at Gettysburg commanding Battery A, 1st New Jersey Artillery, and in his July 17, 1863, official report he has the battery coming up “about one-fourth of a mile south of the Gettysburg Cemetery,” south of the famous Copse of Trees in support of the Union repulse of Pickett’s Charge. A look at the excellent 1876 battle action maps by historian John Bachelder confirms this, as, more recently, do James Hessler and Wayne Motts.

This small section of the 1864 "Elliot Map" shows a portion of the Union center, south and west of General Meade's Headquarters. Each "I" marks a Confederate grave, each "+" marks a Union grave and each "," marks a dead horse's location. While this maps is know to be incredibly precise in some areas, it has proven to be woefully inaccurate in others. LOC

Parsons reported two men killed at Gettysburg, and these are known to be privates Ludwig Kreisel and George Kutter. One of these two is the man who died while taking his last drink of water, but which? And what became of that soldier afterward? According to early burial records in possession of the Gettysburg National Military Park, both were buried near Peter Frey’s stone house. The 1864 “Elliot Map,” which aimed to be a careful study of Gettysburg burial places, indicates 10 Union soldiers buried just northwest of the Peter Frey’s house. By 1864, Kreisel and Kutter had been reinterred right next to each other in the Soldiers National Cemetery. Perhaps someone might do more research to determine where the men were from, or even figure out their respective ages in hopes of seeing whether one better fits Parson’s “Old German” description, but for now, knowing where they fought, roughly where they were buried and where they now rest is the best we can do. This is what we can do for one man. One down, roughly 10,000 to go.

In areas where post-battle photographs were taken, however, we can often establish more pinpoint accuracy. These images are likely to show the dead in the area very close to where they died, connecting specific soldiers geographically to the places where they fell. But first, you need to establish exactly where the photograph was recorded, a process undertaken in the longtime work of photographic historian William A. Frassanito. His efforts demonstrate how, once one can divine when and where a photo was taken, the photos transform from interesting works of art to primary documents, more richly endowed with information than any other source. Based on location alone, the dead Confederate soldiers recorded by Alexander Gardner and his crew around Devil’s Den can be narrowed down to belonging to just a few different regiments. Using burial and hospital records (thousands of wounded soldiers ultimately died in Gettysburg-area army hospitals, firmly establishing they were not photographed in death on the field itself), we can, by process of elimination, further narrow down some of the dead to just a few names.

Gettysburg’s human toll is more visually documented than that of any other Civil War battlefield. Thirty-seven post-battle photographs show roughly 100 corpses — about 1 percent of the dead at Gettysburg. Of these, we can photographically pinpoint some 80 bodies, all of which are near Devil’s Den or on the Rose Farm.

Post-battle sketches can help divine a few more locations of death, but the most substantial, even if not the most precise, guideposts involve the combination of eyewitness accounts with the Elliot Map and the burial records left by those who exhumed remains from battlefield graves, mostly in 1863–1864 (Union) and 1871–1873 (Confederate). These sources have been expertly mined, consolidated, interpreted and assembled into rosters of the dead by an array of historians, especially Kathleen Georg Harrison, Robert K. Krick, John Busey and the late Gregory Coco.

When Gettysburg's Union and Confederate dead were exhumed for reburial in proper cemeteries (1863-1873), workers recorded key location and other information about each soldier's grave — a true gift to today's historians. Gettysburg National Military Park

The assembled rosters account for some 4,700 Confederate and 5,100 Union soldiers killed or mortally wounded at Gettysburg. Thousands of these listings include additional information — fascinating information like age, hometown, occupation, place of death and burial, process of exhumation and final resting place. For example:

  • Pvt. William P. Miller, Co. B, 3rd South Carolina Battalion, killed July 2, 1863, buried George Rose’s farm, west of barn, under large cherry tree “grave deep, with board cover with 6 others,” now buried Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, grave 24, since 5/10/1871
  • Capt. Samuel Wiley Gray, Co. D, 57th North Carolina, 21 years old, killed July 2, 1863, to the right or south of Menchey’s Spring at the foot of East Cemetery Hill, possibly buried by a Capt. C.H. Hawkins, USA. Gray’s father, Robert, with the help of Dr. O’Neal, removed his son’s body Nov. 13–16, 1865 to Winston, N.C.

We can approximate their locations of death using official reports, battlefield accounts, maps, postwar photographs (which might, for instance, show the cherry tree mentioned as a landmark above) and the battlefield itself. For some of the dead, the Elliot Map will help narrow down their initial burial sites. Despite all the work done to date, however, lifetimes of research remains to better understand Gettysburg’s dead.

For example, all of this collected knowledge about the dead brings to light the fact that the remains of several hundred soldiers are unaccounted for, still reposing in their battlefield graves. This is known to be the case at other battlefields as well. It’s never too long before construction or archaeological work in Georgia, Virginia, Tennessee or elsewhere unearths a Civil War soldier’s bones and personal effects. This, along with our increasing understanding about the places soldiers died, demonstrates the critical role of battlefield preservation. Understanding how and where the dead were strewn, buried and reburied at a place like Gettysburg can help us picture and understand what it was like at the others.

Rock carvings done by veterans, either immediately after the fighting or on subsequent visits, can also provide immovable points of reference. After he was killed in the fighting around Stony Hill, Capt. David Acheson was buried by comrades some 750 yards east and north of where he fell. Crude initials carved on this rock marked the spot and facilitated Acheson's family locating and transporting the remains home to Washington County, Pa., just ten days after the battle. Years later, members of the regiment improved the carving and added the regimental designation: "140 PV" (for Pennsylvania Volunteers).

For further reading on how archival research in photographs, maps, and other primary sources have helped illuminate the individual stories of men who fought and died at Gettysburg, consider the following sources:


Featured Video

The Civil War, an epic nine-episode series by the award-winning documentary filmmaker Ken Burns and produced in conjunction with WETA, Washington, D.C., first aired in September of 1990 to an audience of 40 million viewers. The film is a comprehensive and definitive history of the American Civil War, and the recipient of 40 major film and television awards, including two Emmys and two Grammys.

Heralded as an unforgettable introduction to a four-year conflict fought in 10,000 places, The Civil War was five years in the making. The film vividly embraces the entire sweep of the war: the complex causes and lasting effects of America's greatest and most moving calamity, the battles and the homefront, the generals and the private soldiers, the anguish of death in battle and the grief of families at home.


Watch the video: The Civil War - A Waypoint in Military History Lecture


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