Hawkins DD- 873 - History

Hawkins DD- 873 - History


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Hawkins

William Deane Hawkins was born 19 April 1914 in Fort Scott, Kansas, and enlisted in the Marine Corps 5 January 1942. He accepted a battlefield commission in the Solomons 18 November 1942, and was killed 21 November 1943 in the assault on Tarawa. First Lieutenant Hawkins received the Medal of Honor for his gallantry during the bloody assault on Betio in which he gave his life. The citation reads in part: "Fearlessly leading his men on to join the forces fighting desperately to gain a beachhead he repeatedly risked his life throughout the day and night to direct and lead attacks on pill boxes and installations with grenades and demolitions.... Refusing to withdraw after being seriously wounded in the chest during this skirmish, First Lieutenant Hawkins steadfastly carried the fight to the enemy, destroying three more pillboxes before he was caught in a burst or Japanese shell Gre and mortally wounded. His relentless fighting spirit in the face of formidable opposition and his exceptionally daring tactics were an inspiration to his comrades during the most crucial phase of the battle and reflect the highest credit upon the United States Naval Service."

(DD - 873: dp. 2,425, 1. 390'6", b. 41'1", dr. 18'6", s. 35 k.; cpl. 367; a. 65", 63", 521" tt., 6 dcp., 1 dcp. (h.h),

2 dct.; cl. Gearing)

Hawkins (DD-873), originally Beatty but renamed 22 June 1944, was launched by ~Consolidated Steel Co, Orange, Tex., 7 October 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Clara Hawkins, mother of First Lieutenant Hawkins; and commissioned 10 February 1945, Comdr. C. Iverson in command.

Following shakedown training in the Caribbean, Hawkins arrived Norfolk 23 March 1945 to undergo conversion to a radar picket ship. Emerging 26 May, she conducted training exercises before sailing 18 June from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for San Diego and Pearl Harbor. After her arrival 8 July Hawkins prepared to enter the last phase of' the Pacific War, but 3 days after her 12 August departure from Pearl Harbor for Eniwetok the Japanese surrendered. The destroyer continued from Eniwetok to Iwo Jima and Tokyo Bay, arriving 27 August and assisted in early occupation operations. She then escorted ships to and from the Marianas, remaining in Japanese waters until 3 January 1946. Hawkins then steamed to the Philippines and Saipan, finally arriving Pearl Harbor 3 April~l.

Arriving San Diego 11 April, the destroyer took part in training operations off the west coast until sailing again for the far east 6 January 1947. During the months that followed she steamed between Chinese and Korean ports, assisting and supporting American Marine units in their attempts to stabilize the explosive Chinese situation and protect American lives.Hawkins also took part in rescue operations off Hong Kong 19 July 1947, when giant steamer Hong Kong~ sank with over 2,000 passengers on board. She returned to the United Status October 1947.

After a year of operations out of San Diego the ship sailed again for the troubled Far East, arriving Tsingtao, China, 29 October. Following operations off the China coast Hawkins got underway from Tsingtao 6 December. On this long voyage, completing a circuit of the globe, the destroyer visited Ceylon, Turkey, Gibraltar, New York, and Panama before arriving San Diego 16 March 1949.

Hawkins was reassigned to Atlantic Fleet soon afterward, arriving her new home port, Newport, 23 May 1949. For the next year she took part in reserve training cruises and readiness exercises in the Caribbean. The ship had been reclassified DDR 573 15 March 1949. Hawkins departed 2 May 1950 for a cruise with 6th Fleet in the strategic Mediterranean.

While there she and the world were shocked by the Communist invasion of South Korea. After NATO maneuvers she returned to Newport 10 October and prepared to become part of the nation's far flung bulwark in the Korean conflict. Sailing 3 January via the Panama Canal she arrived Pusan 5 February. During her 4 months of Korean duty Hau kins screened the mobile carrier forces during strikes on enemy positions and supply lines, provided antisubmarine protection, and controlled jet aircraft in combat air patrols. She also acted as plane guard during operations in the Formosa Straits designed to discourage Communist aggression against the friendly island. Departing the Far East in June, the destroyer returned to Newport 8 August via the Mediterranean.

For the next few years the veteran ship alternated picket duty and training operations in the western Atlantic with periodic cruises to the Mediterranean with the 6th Fleet. She was in the Eastern Mediterranean during the summer of 1956 when the Suez crisis threatened the security and peace of the area. Hawkins arrived Mayport, Fla., her new home port, 18 August 1960, and soon resumed her pattern of cruises to the Mediterranean. In 1961 she operated with a special Task Group in connection with American space Experiments and missile tests off Cape Canaveral, now Cape Kennedy. When the introduction of offensive missiles into Cuba in 1962 threatened the security of the United States, Hawkins joined with other ships in quarantining that Caribbean country, cruising the Caribbean from late October until December in a modern demonstration of the power of forces afloat. In 1963 the ship returned to the Mediterranean in the Spring and in August took part in Polaris missile tests in the Caribbean with submarine Alexander Hamilton. During the next 5 months Hawkins operated with carriers off Florida and in the Caribbean. Following additional Polaris missile tests With Andrew~ Jackson (SSBN-619) in February 1964, she steamed to Boston 21 March and was placed in commission, in reserve, prior to undergoing FRAM I overhaul.

Reclassified DD-873 on 1 April, Hawkins completed FRAM late in 1964. Assigned to Destroyer Squadron 24 she operated out of Newport until departing 29 September for duty in the Ear East. Steaming via the Panama Canal and the West Coast, she joined the 7th Fleet 23 November as part of America's powerful naval commitment to thwart Communist aggression in Southeast Asia. For the next 3 months she guarded hard-hitting carriers in the South China Sea and the Gulf of Tonkin and provided gunfire support for ground troops along the coast of South Vietnam. She departed Subic Bay late in February 1966, steamed via the Suez Canal, and arrived Newport 8 April.

Hawkins maintained the peak readiness of her crew and equipment over the next few months with exercises oft the East Coast and in the Caribbean. Departing Newport 28 November, she joined the fifth Fleet at Gibraltar 8 December and became flagship for ComDesRon 24. For more than 3 months she cruised the Mediterranean from Spain to Greece before returning to Newport 20 March 1967. Into mid-1967 she operated along the Atlantic Coast from New England to Florida, prepared as always to cruise in defense of the United States and the free world.

Hawkins received two battle stars for Korean service.


USS Hawkins (DD-873)

USS Hawkins (DD-873/DDR-873) là một tàu khu trục lớp Gearing được Hải quân Hoa Kỳ chế tạo vào giai đoạn cuối Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai. Nó là chiếc tàu chiến duy nhất của Hải quân Mỹ được đặt theo tên Đại úy Thủy quân Lục chiến William Deane Hawkins (1914–1943), người đã tử trận trong trận Tarawa và được truy tặng Huân chương Danh dự. [3] [4] Không kịp hoạt động trong Thế chiến II, con tàu tiếp tục phục vụ trong giai đoạn Chiến tranh Lạnh, Chiến tranh Triều Tiên và Chiến tranh Việt Nam, cho đến khi ngừng hoạt động vào năm 1979. Nó được chuyển cho Đài Loan vào năm 1983 và tiếp tục phục vụ cùng Hải quân Trung Hoa dân quốc như là chiếc ROCS Shao Yang, còn được gọi là Tze Yang, cho đến những năm cuối của thập niên 1990 con tàu bị tháo dỡ sau đó, nhưng một phần cấu trúc thượng tầng còn được giữ lại để trưng bày. Hawkins được tặng thưởng hai Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Chiến tranh Triều Tiên.

  • DDR-873, 18 tháng 3 năm 1949
  • DD-873, 1 tháng 4 năm 1964
  • 2.616 tấn Anh (2.658 t) (tiêu chuẩn)
  • 3.460 tấn Anh (3.520 t) (đầy tải)
  • 2 × turbine hơi nước hộp số General Electric
  • 4 × nồi hơi
  • 2 × trục
  • công suất 60.000 shp (45.000 kW)
  • 6 × pháo 5 in (127 mm)/38 caliber trên bệ Mk 38 lưỡng dụng nòng đôi (3×2)
  • 12 × pháo phòng không Bofors 40 mm (2×4 & 2×2)
  • 11 × pháo phòng không Oerlikon 20 mm
  • 2 × đường ray thả mìn sâu
  • 6 × máy phóng mìn sâu K-gun
  • 10 × ống phóng ngư lôi21 in (533 mm)

USS Hawkins (DD-873), J.G. Lotto, WWII

USS Hawkins (DD-873) was a Gearing-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. Following the war, the ship saw service in the Korean War and in the 1970s, was transferred to the Republic of China Navy as Shao Yang, also known as Tze Yang. She remained in service until the 1990s. The ship was then scrapped with the exception of her superstructure, which became part of a display at a museum.

Hawkins, originally to be named Beatty, but renamed on 22 June 1944 and launched by Consolidated Steel Corporation, Orange, Texas, 7 October 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Clara Jane Hawkins, mother of namesake First Lieutenant William Deane Hawkins (killed on Tarawa). The destroyer was commissioned on 10 February 1945, Comdr. C. Iverson in command.

Following shakedown training in the Caribbean, Hawkins arrived at Norfolk on 23 March 1945 to undergo conversion to a radar picket ship. Emerging 26 May, she conducted training exercises before sailing 18 June from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for San Diego and Pearl Harbor. After her arrival 8 July Hawkins prepared to enter the last phase of the Pacific War, but 3 days after her 12 August departure from Pearl Harbor for Eniwetok the Japanese surrendered. The destroyer continued from Eniwetok to Iwo Jima and Tokyo Bay, arriving 27 August, and assisted in early occupation operations. She then escorted ships to and from the Marianas, remaining in Japanese waters until 3 January 1946. Hawkins then steamed to the Philippines and Saipan, finally arriving Pearl Harbor 3 April.

Arriving at San Diego on 11 April, the destroyer took part in training operations off the West Coast until sailing again for the Far East January 1947. During the months that followed she steamed between Chinese and Korean ports, assisting and supporting American Marine units in their attempts to stabilize the Chinese situation and protect American lives. Hawkins under the command of Cmdr. Alfred L. Cope, played a significant role in rescue operations off Chilang Point Hong Kong 19 July 1947, when the steamer SS Hong Kheng sank with over 2,000 passengers on board. She returned to the United States 8 October 1947.

After a year of operations out of San Diego the ship sailed again for the Far East, arriving at Tsingtao, China on 29 October. Following operations off the Chinese coast Hawkins got underway from Tsingtao on 6 December. On this long voyage, completing a circuit of the globe, the destroyer visited Ceylon, Turkey, Gibraltar, New York City, and Panama before arriving San Diego 10 March 1949.

Hawkins in the Mediterranean in 1957.

Hawkins was reassigned to the U.S. Atlantic Fleet soon afterward, arriving at her new home port, Newport, Rhode Island on 23 May 1949. For the next year she took part in Reserve training cruises and readiness exercises in the Caribbean. The ship had been reclassified DDR-873 on 18 March 1949. Hawkins departed on 2 May 1950 for a cruise with 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean.

While in the Mediterranean, the world became aware of the Communist invasion of South Korea. After NATO maneuvers, Hawkins returned to Newport 10 October and prepared to become part of the fleet sailing for what became known as the Korean War. Sailing on 3 January via the Panama Canal she arrived at Pusan on 5 February. During her four months of Korean duty, Hawkins screened the mobile aircraft carrier forces during strikes on enemy positions and supply lines, provided antisubmarine protection, and controlled jet aircraft in combat air patrols. She also acted as plane guard during operations in the Formosa Straits designed to discourage Communist aggression against the friendly island. Departing the Far East in June, the destroyer returned to Newport on 8 August via the Mediterranean.

Post Korean War service to 1964

For the next few years the veteran ship alternated picket duty and training operations in the western Atlantic with periodic cruises to the Mediterranean with the 6th Fleet. She was in the Eastern Mediterranean during the summer of 1950 when the Suez crisis threatened the security and peace of the area. Hawkins arrived Mayport, Florida, her new homeport, 18 August 1960. She became part of DESRON-8 performing exercises in the Bahamas and Caribbean areas with one deployment of radar picket duty off the coast of Nicaragua returning to Mayport in December 1960. In January 1961 the destroyer soon resumed her pattern of cruises to the Mediterranean. In 1961 she operated with a special Task Group in connection with American space experiments and missile tests off Cape Canaveral, Florida. When the introduction of offensive missiles into Cuba in 1962 threatened the security of the United States, Hawkins joined with other ships in quarantining that Caribbean country, cruising the Caribbean from late October until December. In 1963 the ship returned to the Mediterranean in January returning to Mayport in July and in August took part in Polaris missile tests in the Caribbean with the submarine USS Alexander Hamilton. During the next 5 months, Hawkins operated with aircraft carriers off Florida and in the Caribbean. Following additional Polaris missile tests with USS Andrew Jackson in February 1964, the destroyer steamed to Boston 21 March and was placed in commission, in reserve, prior to undergoing a FRAM I overhaul.

Reclassified DD-873 on 1 April, Hawkins completed FRAM late in 1964. Assigned to Destroyer Squadron 24, she operated out of Newport until departing 29 September for duty in the Far East. Steaming via the Panama Canal and the West Coast, she joined the 7th Fleet on 23 November. For the next three months she guarded aircraft carriers in the South China Sea and the Gulf of Tonkin and provided gunfire support for ground troops along the coast of South Vietnam. She departed Subic Bay late in February 1966, steamed via the Suez Canal, and arrived Newport 8 April.

Hawkins, over the next few months, participated in naval exercises off the East Coast and in the Caribbean. Departing Newport on 28 November, she joined the 6th Fleet at Gibraltar 8 December and became flagship for ComDesRon 24. For more than three months she cruised the Mediterranean from Spain to Greece before returning to Newport 20 March 1967. Into mid-1967 she operated along the Atlantic Coast from New England to Florida.

Hawkins went into the Boston Naval Shipyard in 1967 for overhaul. After months in the shipyard and in dry dock, the ship went to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for a shakedown cruise.

On 11 February 1969, Hawkins was operating off the coast of Cuba with the submarine USS Chopper when Chopper had a near-fatal accident. The submarine managed to surface but Chopper shot through the surface of the ocean, nearly vertical. The entire forward section of the submarine, to the aft edge of the sail, cleared the surface before she fell back.

In July 1969, Hawkins, working out of Cape Canaveral, Florida began Polaris missile tests with the Royal Navy's submarine HMS Renown, which ended with a successful test firing of a missile down a test range. Immediately afterward, these same tests were made with the submarine USS Thomas Jefferson but in this case the test was aborted shortly after launch.

Hawkins took part in the United States space project in November 1969 when it was assigned to the Apollo 12 Atlantic Recovery Force. The ship was fitted with special capsule recovery gear and practiced along with a Navy Underwater Demolition Team (UDT) to be prepared to recover the space capsule in the Atlantic if the Pacific landing was aborted.

In December 1969, Hawkins changed homeport from Newport, Rhode Island, to Norfolk, Virginia.

In 1970, the United States Navy assigned the destroyer USS Steinaker to the NATO Standing Naval Force Atlantic for Exercise Atlantic Ice. Steinaker ran aground while doing maneuvers in a fjord near Harstad, traveling at 25 knots (46 km/h 29 mph) and was removed from the exercise. Hawkins was directed to replace Steinaker and complete their assignment with NATO. Hawkins met Steinaker in Bergen, Norway to offload their munitions, allowing them to enter the repair facility at Haakonsvern. From Bergen, Hawkins traveled to Oslo with exercises above the Arctic Circle en route. After more exercise in the North Sea, the force stopped in Kiel and then proceeded to Copenhagen in mid-May. There was a show of flags in Antwerp and Plymouth. Leaving Plymouth at the end of May, the force exercised with a French submarine in the Bay of Biscay before going to Lisbon.

On 9 February 1971, Hawkins again participated in the space program as a backup recovery ship in the Atlantic for Apollo 14.

In the spring of 1977, the USS Hawkins DD-873 was detached to the US Sixth Fleet, where she certainly served until October.

From 1976 to 1979, the Hawkins was assigned as a Naval Reserve training ship in Philadelphia. By that time she was nearing the end of her designed lifespan. Science fiction writer James D. Macdonald, then an ensign in the United States Naval Reserve, was assigned to her during this period, and reported to the captain one morning that the sounding tape used to check the water level in the ship's tanks had punched through the striking plate in one of the sounding tubes and the hull plate beyond it, indicating the hull was becoming unsound.

Transfer to ROC Navy and fate

The ship was stricken from the Navy List on 1 October 1979 and sold to the Taiwan in 1983. The ship was renamed Shao Yang[1][2] or Tze Yang[3] in service with the Taiwan Navy. The ship was scrapped in the late 1990s, but part of her superstructure is on display at a museum in Taiwan.[3] [4]


The table below contains the names of sailors who served aboard the USS Hawkins (DD 873). Please keep in mind that this list does only include records of people who submitted their information for publication on this website. If you also served aboard and you remember one of the people below you can click on the name to send an email to the respective sailor. Would you like to have such a crew list on your website?

Looking for US Navy memorabilia? Try the Ship's Store.

There are 127 crew members registered for the USS Hawkins (DD 873).

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1967 | 1968 &ndash 1973 | 1974 &ndash now

NameRank/RatePeriodDivisionRemarks/Photo
Wiebusch, CurtEW1Feb 1974 &ndash Dec 1976OIEnjoyed being a part of the crew of this ship very much
Torres, Fermando sk3Apr 6, 1974 &ndash Sep 19, 1977supply/boatsmanI started as a boatsman mate then transfered to supply. MY HOME E-MAIL IS, [email protected]
Villeneuve, RonaldMM3May 1, 1974 &ndash Sep 30, 1974Foward Engine Room Dropped off in Madagascar with Greg welch after refueling accdient August 3 1974. [email protected] [email protected] Greg Welsh Died of cancer April 2012
Villeneuve, RonaldMM3May 10, 1974 &ndash Oct 10, 1974Foward Engine roomDorpped off in Madascar with SM GW Welsh on Aug 3 1974
Torres, Fernandosk 3Jun 16, 1974 &ndash Sep 9, 1977supplyI am looking for anyone involved in a tsunami accident off the coast Madagascar, 1974. My new e-mail address is [email protected]
Gilliam, DavidBT21975 &ndash 1977B
Franckewich, Mike MM21975 &ndash 1978M
Hommel, BobQM3Jan 5, 1975 &ndash Dec 18, 1976Ops
Reilly, Tom (Raz)E2Jul 1975 &ndash Aug 1977Boatswains MateI'm a disabled ex-worker that spends all my time and days rottin away in this F_ _ k in' dump that I call a home. Who knew that all the old people was right when they said growing old sucks. Have a great day.
Lee, Ray (Munchkin)E-3Sep 14, 1975 &ndash Dec 11, 19771ST
Smith, JayEM3Mar 16, 1976 &ndash Jun 20, 1979R
Lipiec, StanSTG 3May 1, 1976 &ndash May 1, 19783
Szabo, JohnGMT2Jul 1976 &ndash Feb 19791st
Ferguson, Kerry FergieEM-3Jul 14, 1976 &ndash Mar 27, 1977 hell of a ride.
Johnson, Maurice "Pc"PCSNSep 15, 1976 &ndash Feb 1978Postal Clerk At the time, I never thought I would miss it now, I'd give anything to go back to sea on her again, though I know the old girl was decommed.
Weber, ChuckLTJG1977 &ndash 1978SupplyTransferred with the crew from USS Rich. Fourth and final time I was stationed with CO "Big George" Stefencavage. Crazy times! The Hawk was one broke ship.
Davison, PhilipGMGSAJan 1, 1977 &ndash May 21, 19772ndThis was my first ship. what a trip!
Isaman, BobSTG3Apr 1977 &ndash Jan 19783rdFirst ship in my career! Left in ྊ to go to Submarine School.
Dube, EricGMG2Apr 5, 1977 &ndash May 12, 1978Weapons
Walker, JohnHT2May 1977 &ndash Jun 1979RHope everyone is doing great!
Gusler, Hubert ( Gus )BT2Dec 1, 1977 &ndash Oct 31, 1978BLPO #2 FIRE ROOM
Fodi, DaveGMT1978 &ndash 19791Miss that old girl
Weaver, Davidmmfn1978 &ndashm
MacDonald, JamesENS1978 &ndash 1979Deck/GunneryMy first ship as an officer, directly out of OCS.
Turygan, DanSM2Jul 1978 &ndash Sep 1980CommunicationsCame to her from the Rich. What a difference! While the Rich made every commitment the "Hawk" was so worn out and tired she was constantly pierside. Poor Snipes! Good crew though. She decommed in Philly . Great CO!
Segura, RobertEM3Sep 1979 &ndash Dec 1979RepairEMMC of EM school got me orders to the Hawk - as a reward before I went to Nuke School. I had no idea of how big of a favor the MC did for me, until I got to my sub - USS Nathaniel Greene SSBN 636. Thank MC.

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1967 | 1968 &ndash 1973 | 1974 &ndash now


Hawkins DD- 873 - History

(DD-873: dp. 2,425, l. 390'6", b. 41'1", dr. 18'6", s. 35 k. cpl. 367 a. 6 5", 6 3", 521" tt., 6 dcp., 1 dcp. (h.h), 2 dct. cl. Gearing)

Hawkins (DD-873), originally Beatty but renamed 22 June 1944, was launched by Consolidated Steel Co, Orange, Tex., 7 October 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Clara Hawkins, mother of First Lieutenant Hawkins and commissioned 10 February 1945, Comdr. C. Iverson in command.

Following shakedown training in the Caribbean, Hawkins arrived Norfolk 23 March 1945 to undergo conversion to a radar picket ship. Emerging 26 May, she conducted training exercises before sailing 18 June from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for San Diego and Pearl Harbor. After her arrival 8 July Hawkins prepared to enter the last phase of the Pacific War, but 3 days after her 12 August departure from Pearl Harbor for Eniwetok the Japanese surrendered. The destroyer continued from Eniwetok to Iwo Jima and Tokyo Bay, arriving 27 August and assisted in early occupation operations. She then escorted ships to and from the Marianas, remaining in Japanese waters until 3 January 1946. Hawkins then steamed to the Philippines and Saipan, finally arriving Pearl Harbor 3 April.

Arriving San Diego 11 April, the destroyer took part in training operations off the west coast until sailing again for the far east 6 January 1947. During the months that followed she steamed between Chinese and Korean ports, assisting and supporting American Marine units in their attempts to stabilize the explosive Chinese situation and protect American lives.Hawkins also took part in rescue operations off Hong Kong 19 July 1947, when giant steamer Hong Kheng sank with over 2,000 passengers on board. She returned to the United Status 8 October 1947.

After a year of operations out of San Diego the ship sailed again for the troubled Far East, arriving Tsingtao, China, 29 October. Following operations off the China coast Hawkins got underway from Tsingtao 6 December. On this long voyage, completing a circuit of the globe, the destroyer visited Ceylon, Turkey, Gibraltar, New York, and Panama before arriving San Diego 16 March 1949.

Hawkins was reassigned to Atlantic Fleet soon afterward, arriving her new home port, Newport, 23 May 1949. For the next year she took part in reserve training cruises nud readiness exercises in the Caribbean. The ship had been reclassified DDR-873 18 March 1949. Hawkins departed 2 May 1950 for a cruise with 6th Fleet in the strategic Mediterranean.

While there she and the world were shocked by the Communist invasion of South Korea. After NATO maneuvers she returned to Newport 10 October and prepared to become part of the nation's far flung bulwark in the Korean conflict. Sailing 3 January via the Panama Canal she arrived Pusan 5 February. During her 4 months of Korean duty Hawkins screened the mobile carrier forces during strikes on enemy positions and supply lines, provided antisubmarine protection, and controlled jet aircraft in combat air patrols. She also acted as plane guard during operations in the Formosa Straits designed to discourage Communist aggression against the friendly island. Departing the Far East in June, the destroyer returned to Newport 8 August via the Mediterranean.

For the next few years the veteran ship alternated picket duty and training operations in the western Atlantic with periodic cruises to the Mediterranean with the 6th Fleet. She was in the Eastern Mediterranean during the summer of 1956 when the Suez crisis threatened the security and peace of the area. Hawkins arrived Mayport, Fla., her new home port, 18 August 1960, and soon resumed her pattern of cruises to the Mediterranean. In 1961 she operated with a special Task Group in connection with American space Experiments and missile tests off Cape Canaveral, now Cape Kennedy. When the introduction of offensive missiles into Cuba in 1962 threatened the security of the United States, Hawkins joined with other ships in quarantining that Caribbean country, cruising the Caribbean from late October until December in a modern demonstration of the power of forces afloat. In 1963 the ship returned to the Mediterranean in the Spring and in August took part in Polaris missile tests in the Caribbean with submarine Alexander Hamilton. During the next 5 months Hawkins operated with carriers off Florida and in the Caribbean. Following additional Polaris missile tests With Andrew Jackson (SSBN-619) in February 1964, she steamed to Boston 21 March and was placed in commission, in reserve, prior to undergoing FRAM I overhaul.

Reclassified DD-873 on 1 April, Hawkins completed FRAM late in 1964. Assigned to Destroyer Squadron 24 she operated out of Newport until departing 29 September for duty in the Ear East. Steaming via the Panama Canal and the West Coast, she joined the 7th Fleet 23 November as part of America's powerful naval commitment to thwart Communist aggression in Southeast Asia. For the next 3 months she guarded hard-hitting carriers in the South China Sea and the Gulf of Tonkin and provided gunfire support for ground troops along the coast of South Vietnam. She departed Subic Bay late in February 1966, steamed via the Suez Canal, and arrived Newport 8 April.

Hawkins maintained the peak readiness of her crew and equipment over the next few months with exercises oft the East Coast and in the Caribbean. Departing Newport 28 November, she joined the 6th Fleet at Gibraltar 8 December and became flagship for ComDesRon 24. For more than 3 months she cruised the Mediterranean from Spain to Greece before returning to Newport 20 March 1967. Into mid-1967 she operated along the Atlantic Coast from New England to Florida, prepared as always to cruise in defense of the United States and the free world.


Military

Hawkins (DD-873), originally Beatty but renamed 22 June 1944, was launched by Consolidated Steel Co, Orange, Tex., 7 October 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Clara Hawkins, mother of First Lieutenant Hawkins and commissioned 10 February 1945, Comdr. C. Iverson in command.

Following shakedown training in the Caribbean, Hawkins arrived Norfolk 23 March 1945 to undergo conversion to a radar picket ship. Emerging 26 May, she conducted training exercises before sailing 18 June from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for San Diego and Pearl Harbor. After her arrival 8 July Hawkins prepared to enter the last phase of the Pacific War, but 3 days after her 12 August departure from Pearl Harbor for Eniwetok the Japanese surrendered. The destroyer continued from Eniwetok to Iwo Jima and Tokyo Bay, arriving 27 August and assisted in early occupation operations. She then escorted ships to and from the Marianas, remaining in Japanese waters until 3 January 1946. Hawkins then steamed to the Philippines and Saipan, finally arriving Pearl Harbor 3 April.

Arriving San Diego 11 April, the destroyer took part in training operations off the west coast until sailing again for the far east 6 January 1947. During the months that followed she steamed between Chinese and Korean ports, assisting and supporting American Marine units in their attempts to stabilize the explosive Chinese situation and protect American lives.Hawkins also took part in rescue operations off Hong Kong 19 July 1947, when giant steamer Hong Kheng sank with over 2,000 passengers on board. She returned to the United Status 8 October 1947.

After a year of operations out of San Diego the ship sailed again for the troubled Far East, arriving Tsingtao, China, 29 October. Following operations off the China coast Hawkins got underway from Tsingtao 6 December. On this long voyage, completing a circuit of the globe, the destroyer visited Ceylon, Turkey, Gibraltar, New York, and Panama before arriving San Diego 16 March 1949.

Hawkins was reassigned to Atlantic Fleet soon afterward, arriving her new home port, Newport, 23 May 1949. For the next year she took part in reserve training cruises nud readiness exercises in the Caribbean. The ship had been reclassified DDR-873 18 March 1949. Hawkins departed 2 May 1950 for a cruise with 6th Fleet in the strategic Mediterranean.

While there she and the world were shocked by the Communist invasion of South Korea. After NATO maneuvers she returned to Newport 10 October and prepared to become part of the nation's far flung bulwark in the Korean conflict. Sailing 3 January via the Panama Canal she arrived Pusan 5 February. During her 4 months of Korean duty Hawkins screened the mobile carrier forces during strikes on enemy positions and supply lines, provided antisubmarine protection, and controlled jet aircraft in combat air patrols. She also acted as plane guard during operations in the Formosa Straits designed to discourage Communist aggression against the friendly island. Departing the Far East in June, the destroyer returned to Newport 8 August via the Mediterranean.

For the next few years the veteran ship alternated picket duty and training operations in the western Atlantic with periodic cruises to the Mediterranean with the 6th Fleet. She was in the Eastern Mediterranean during the summer of 1956 when the Suez crisis threatened the security and peace of the area. Hawkins arrived Mayport, Fla., her new home port, 18 August 1960, and soon resumed her pattern of cruises to the Mediterranean. In 1961 she operated with a special Task Group in connection with American space Experiments and missile tests off Cape Canaveral, now Cape Kennedy. When the introduction of offensive missiles into Cuba in 1962 threatened the security of the United States, Hawkins joined with other ships in quarantining that Caribbean country, cruising the Caribbean from late October until December in a modern demonstration of the power of forces afloat. In 1963 the ship returned to the Mediterranean in the Spring and in August took part in Polaris missile tests in the Caribbean with submarine Alexander Hamilton. During the next 5 months Hawkins operated with carriers off Florida and in the Caribbean. Following additional Polaris missile tests With Andrew Jackson (SSBN-619) in February 1964, she steamed to Boston 21 March and was placed in commission, in reserve, prior to undergoing FRAM I overhaul.

Reclassified DD-873 on 1 April, Hawkins completed FRAM late in 1964. Assigned to Destroyer Squadron 24 she operated out of Newport until departing 29 September for duty in the Ear East. Steaming via the Panama Canal and the West Coast, she joined the 7th Fleet 23 November as part of America's powerful naval commitment to thwart Communist aggression in Southeast Asia. For the next 3 months she guarded hard-hitting carriers in the South China Sea and the Gulf of Tonkin and provided gunfire support for ground troops along the coast of South Vietnam. She departed Subic Bay late in February 1966, steamed via the Suez Canal, and arrived Newport 8 April.

Hawkins maintained the peak readiness of her crew and equipment over the next few months with exercises oft the East Coast and in the Caribbean. Departing Newport 28 November, she joined the 6th Fleet at Gibraltar 8 December and became flagship for ComDesRon 24. For more than 3 months she cruised the Mediterranean from Spain to Greece before returning to Newport 20 March 1967. Into mid-1967 she operated along the Atlantic Coast from New England to Florida, prepared as always to cruise in defense of the United States and the free world.


Post Korean War service to 1964 [ edit | edit source ]

For the next few years the veteran ship alternated picket duty and training operations in the western Atlantic with periodic cruises to the Mediterranean with the 6th Fleet. She was in the Eastern Mediterranean during the summer of 1950 when the Suez crisis threatened the security and peace of the area. Hawkins arrived Mayport, Florida, her new homeport, 18 August 1960. She became part of DESRON-8 performing exercises in the Bahamas and Caribbean areas with one deployment of radar picket duty off the coast of Nicaragua returning to Mayport in December 1960. In January 1961 she soon resumed her pattern of cruises to the Mediterranean. In 1961 she operated with a special Task Group in connection with American space experiments and missile tests off Cape Canaveral, now Cape Kennedy. When the introduction of offensive missiles into Cuba in 1962 threatened the security of the United States, Hawkins joined with other ships in quarantining that Caribbean country, cruising the Caribbean from late October until December in a modern demonstration of the power of forces afloat. In 1963 the ship returned to the Mediterranean in January returnig to Mayport in July and in August took part in Polaris missile tests in the Caribbean with USS Alexander Hamilton (SSBN-617). During the next 5 months, Hawkins operated with carriers off Florida and in the Caribbean. Following additional Polaris missile tests with USS Andrew Jackson (SSBN-619) in February 1964, she steamed to Boston 21 March and was placed in commission, in reserve, prior to undergoing FRAM I overhaul.


Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

William Deane Hawkins was born 19 April 1914 in Fort Scott, Kansas, and enlisted in the Marine Corps 5 January 1942. He accepted a battlefield commission in the Solomons 18 November 1942, and was killed 21 November 1943 in the assault on Tarawa. First Lieutenant Hawkins received the Medal of Honor for his gallantry during the bloody assault on Betio in which he gave his life. The citation reads in part: "Fearlessly leading his men on to join the forces fighting desperately to gain a beachhead, he repeatedly risked his life throughout the day and night to direct and lead attacks on pill boxes and installations with grenades and demolitions. . . . Refusing to withdraw after being seriously wounded in the chest during this skirmish, First Lieutenant Hawkins steadfastly carried the fight to the enemy, destroying three more pillboxes before he was caught in a burst of Japanese shell fire and mortally wounded. His relentless fighting spirit in the face of formidable opposition and his exceptionally daring tactics were an inspiration to his comrades during the most crucial phase of the battle and reflect the highest credit upon the United States Naval Service."

(DD-873 : dp. 2,425 l. 390'6" b. 41'1" dr. 18'6" s. 35 k. cpl. 367 a. 65", 63", 521" tt., 6 dcp., 1 dcp. (h.h), 2 dct. cl. Gearing)

Hawkins (DD-873), originally Beatty but renamed 22 June 1944, was launched by Consolidated Steel Co., Orange, Tex., 7 October 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Clara Hawkins, mother of First Lieutenant Hawkins and commissioned 10 February 1945, Comdr. C. Iverson in command.

Following shakedown training in the Caribbean, Hawkins arrived Norfolk 23 March 1945 to undergo conversion to a radar picket ship. Emerging 26 May, she conducted training exercises before sailing 18 June from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for San Diego and Pearl Harbor. After her arrival 8 July Hawkins prepared to enter the last phase of the Pacific War, but 3 days after her 12 August departure from Pearl Harbor for Eniwetok the Japanese surrendered. The destroyer continued from Eniwetok to Iwo Jima and Tokyo Bay, arriving 27 August, and assisted in early occupation operations. She then escorted ships to and from the Marianas, remaining in Japanese waters until 3 January 1946. Hawkins then steamed to the Philippines and Saipan, finally arriving Pearl Harbor 3 April.

Arriving San Diego 11 April, the destroyer took part in training operations off the west coast until sailing again for the far east 0 January 1947. During the months that followed she steamed between Chinese and Korean ports, assisting and supporting American Marine units in their attempts to stabilize the explosive Chinese situation and protect American lives. Hatching also took part in rescue operations off Hong Kong 19 July 1947, when giant steamer Hong Khcng sank with over 2,000 passengers on board. She returned to the United States 8 October 1947.

After a year of operations out of San Diego the ship sailed again for the troubled Far East, arriving Tsingtao, China, 29 October. Following operations off the China coast Hawkins got underway from Tsingtao C December. On this long voyage, completing a circuit of the globe, the destroyer visited Ceylon, Turkey, Gibraltar, New York, and Panama before arriving San Diego 10 March 1949.

Hawkins was reassigned to Atlantic Fleet soon afterward, arriving her new home port, Newport, 23 May 1949. For the next year she took part in reserve training cruises and readiness exercises in the Caribbean. The ship had been reclassifled DDR-873 18 March 1949. Hawkins departed 2 May 1950 for a cruise with 6th Fleet in the strategic Mediterranean.

While there she and the world were shocked by the Communist invasion of South Korea. After NATO maneuvers she returned to Newport 10 October and prepared to become part of the nation's far flung bulwark in the Korean conflict. Sailing 3 January via the Panama Canal she arrived Pusan 5 February. During her 4 months of Korean duty Haickins [sic] screened the mobile carrier forces during strikes on enemy positions and supply lines, provided antisubmarine protection, and controlled jet aircraft in combat air patrols. She also acted as plane guard during operations in the Formosa Straits designed to discourage Communist aggression against the friendly island. Departing the Far East in June, the destroyer returned to Newport 8 August via the Mediterranean.

For the next few years the veteran ship alternated picket duty and training operations in the western Atlantic with periodic cruises to the Mediterranean with the (6th Fleet. She was in the Eastern Mediterranean during the summer of 1950 when the Suez crisis threatened the security and peace of the area. Hawkins arrived May-port, Fla., her new homeport, 18 August 1960, and soon resumed her pattern of cruises to the Mediterranean. In 1961 she operated with a special Task Group in connection with American space experiments and missile tests off Cape Canaveral, now Cape Kennedy. When the introduction of offensive missiles into Cuba in 1962 threatened the security of the United States, Hawkins joined with other ships in quarantining that Caribbean country, cruising the Caribbean from late October until December in a modern demonstration of the power of forces afloat. In 1963 the ship returned to the Mediterranean in the Spring and in August took part in Polaris missile tests in the Caribbean with submarine Alexander Hamilton. During the next 5 months Hawkins operated with carriers off Florida and in the Caribbean. Following additional Polaris missile tests with Andrew Jackson (SSBN-619) in February 1964, she steamed to Boston 21 March and was placed in commission, in reserve, prior to undergoing FRAM I overhaul.

Reclassified DD-873 on 1 April, Hawkins completed FRAM late in 1964. Assigned to Destroyer Squadron 24, she operated out of Newport until departing 29 September for duty in the Far East. Steaming via the Panama Canal and the West Coast, she joined the 7th Fleet 23 November as part of America's powerful naval commitment to thwart Communist aggression in Southeast Asia. For the next 3 months she guarded hard-hitting carriers in the South China Sea and the Gulf of Tonkin and provided gunfire support for ground troops along the coast of South Vietnam. She departed Subic Bay late in February 1966, steamed via the Suez Canal, and arrived Newport 8 April.

Hawkins maintained the peak readiness of her crew and equipment over the next few months with exercises off the East Coast and in the Caribbean. Departing Newport 28 November, she joined the 6th Fleet at Gibraltar 8 December and became flagship for ComDesRon 24. For more than 3 months she cruised the Mediterranean from Spain to Greece before returning to Newport 20 March 1967. Into mid-1967 she operated along the Atlantic Coast from New England to Florida, prepared as always to cruise in defense of the United States and the free world. Hawkins received two battle stars for Korean service.


USS HAWKINS DD-873 Framed Navy Ship Display

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PLEASE VIEW OUR OTHER GREAT USS HAWKINS DD-873 INFORMATION:
USS Hawkins DD-873 Guestbook Forum


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Please view our commemorative USS Hawkins DD-873 products in our Ship's Store!

David Wm. Green
Years Served: 1972
My first duty station in the Fleet. Came on board as MMFN from MM-A school in Great Lakes after Boot Camp in Orlando, Fla. and was looking forward to my live at sea. We went out once then went into drydock in Newport News and lived in a barrack. I volenteered for Viet Nam service to get into the mix and recieved my orders to the USS Newport News CA-148 in April, just before she pulled out for WESPAC. There were a few others that were transferred also, but I just remeber Dwight K. Rooks from Houston, Texas (Candy Street I think). He changed rates to Signalman if I remember correctly. The rest of my Naval Life is recorded on the Newport News Guestbook if anyone really cares. I loved my tour in the Navy and made life long friends.

I came on board in Rota Spain in 1972 on the Med Cruse. I came on as a steward then changed rates to OS. Tough study for me. My best friend, RM2 Paul Stone, made the time on the ship a lot of fun. Great ship, great group of guys! I am proud to have served with you all. I swapped to USS Reeves in Pearl Harbor in 1974. Hard to leave but what can I say…Hawaii! It was spectacular! Wishing you all the best!


Watch the video: THE HAWKINS - BLACK GOLD Live in the Woods


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